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Ocean and Ecosystem Science Seminar Series

OES Seminars are held at 10am in the George Needler Boardroom (Room VS-427, van Steenburgh Building, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia).

November 2017 "Coffee Talk"
Friday November 03, 2017

Needler Boardroom

Greg Siddall, Ocean Engineering and Technology Section, BIO, DFO and Dariia Atamanchuk, CERC.OCEAN, Dept. of Oceanography, Dalhousie University.

SeaCycler’s Labrador Sea Deployment; An Update and Overview of High Resolution Measurements

SeaCycler collects daily, vertical profiles (0-150m) of a wide range of oceanographic parameters (including, but not limited to CTD, O2, pCO2, Nitrate, Velocity & Bio-Optical) and transfers them to shore in near-real time from a single location of the open ocean. SeaCycler is a Canadian invention developed primarily at Bedford Institute of Oceanography with substantial contributions from Dalhousie University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography (USA) and the German government. Despite its 14 deployments to date, there is only one SeaCycler in existence.

Come and hear the story of its development, trials and latest successes. Some high resolution measurements from the latest year-long Lab Sea deployment (led by the CERC.OCEAN group at Dalhousie) will be presented to emphasize the importance of this new technology for determining more accurate estimates of gas fluxes, annual carbon budget & seasonal productivity, and for investigating various other biogeochemical processes.

Friday November 10, 2017

Needler Boardroom

Trevor Kenchington (Consultant Fisheries Scientist, Gadus Associates, Dalhousie University and BIO)

What really shapes the growth and decline of fisheries? Examples from the global history of trawling

Fisheries science is conventionally focused on the biology, dynamics and autecology of aquatic resources. During the last quarter-century, consideration of ecosystems and oceanographic drivers has been strengthened, through the Ecosystem Approach for Fisheries (EAF). However, repeated calls for equal attention to the human dimensions of fisheries have found little traction. Yet examination of the past growth, decline, successes and failures of fisheries suggests that consumers fill a converse but co-equal role to that of the resources, while human warfare is as powerful an external driver is as oceanographic change, and the preservation properties of fish are as important as their biological characteristics. In this presentation, those observations are illustrated with examples drawn from the global history of trawling, especially through its 250-year expansion from the mid-18th Century to now. Building on those empirical experiences, I conclude that fisheries are best seen as one end of "fishery and seafood-supply linkages", connecting resources and consumers. Organic material derived from the resources flows through those linkages in one direction, while wealth derived from consumers flows the opposite way. The quest for a share of that wealth not only drives the participation of people (from fishermen to the staffs of seafood restaurants) but also their on-going adaptation of the linkages, and hence the fisheries, in response to changing circumstances. Just as fishery resources are embedded in and shaped by ecosystems, so seafood consumers and the linkages between are embedded in and shaped by human systems. Thus, although EAF encourages a far broader perspective than the old single-species approach to fisheries, it still falls short. I propose that we need a Holistic Approach for Fisheries (HAF), incorporating balanced consideration of both ecosystems and human systems.


Friday November 17, 2017

Needler Boardroom

Will Perrie (Bedford Institute of Oceanography)
Fine-scale features of the ocean surface from Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR): Sea ice and melt ponds
High resolution SAR images from the Canada’s RADARSAT-2 satellite can be used to investigate the spatial characteristics of the sea surface. With SAR, the roughness of the sea surface can be determined and used to measure many parameters, for example wind field, sea state, currents and additional other variables over large areas. In the near future, several earth observation satellite systems will be also launched with a new kind of SAR, so-called compact polarimetry SAR. For example, RADARSAT Constellation Mission will be launched in 2018 with 3 new satellites allowing daily coverage of 95% of the global ocean and up to 4x coverage of Canadian waters at ~km scale. It is important to study the oceanic applications of this advanced new SAR. Here, we give an overview and discuss detection and monitoring of sea ice and their associated melt ponds.
Contact:

Brent Law
902-426-8548
Brent.Law@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Will Perrie
902-426-3985
William.Perrie@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Emanuel Devred
902-426-2481
Emmanuel.Devred@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Zeliang Wang
902-407-8113
Zeliang.Wang@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Friday November 24, 2017

Needler Boardroom

Gilbert Brunet – CMOS Speaker West

Toward Seamless Weather and Climate Earth-system Prediction

Coffee talks are open to everyone. Regular talks are at 10:00 on Fridays in the Needler Boardroom - Van Steenburgh 427, BIO. People not working at BIO will need to be signed in at the front desk, main entrance to attend (or give) the seminar. Talks are scheduled for 1 hour and we suggest preparing 40 minutes worth of material. Questions and discussion should more than fill any remaining time. Material can be unfinished work in progress, proposed projects or cruises, cruise reports, ideas you wish to expose to critical review before undertaking studies, recent conference reports, finished talks presented elsewhere long ago, etc. We particularly welcome talks from scientists visiting BIO and can make special efforts to slot them into the regular series or hold seminars on other days to fit their timetable.

Contact:

Brent Law
902-426-8548
Brent.Law@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Will Perrie
902-426-3985
William.Perrie@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Emanuel Devred
902-426-2481
Emmanuel.Devred@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Zeliang Wang
902-407-8113



Related Links

  • Bedford Institute of Oceanography Seminar Series
  • Dalhousie University Department of Oceanography Seminars
  • Dalhousie Physical Oceanography & Meteorological Seminars
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